Wellness 16...The quest for Purpose, the need for energy and the avoidance of musterbation

Created on 21/09/16 11:31 by Tracey May

Wellness 16 London

By Mark Randall, Managing Director

 

On Monday I attended the Wellness 16 Conference at Deloittes offices in New Street Square. An event that included some 18 speakers, offering a rich variety of perspectives regarding wellness in the workplace. We all understand the correlation between wellbeing and productivity but I have not spent a day with so many powerful perspectives relaying the importance of this, woven together by the team at www.unwired.eu.com.

 

Despina Katsikakis Chaired the event with excellent succinct insights between speakers, whilst keeping an eye on the clock - aware of the demanding schedule.

 

First up was Andy Gibson of Mindapples, who set the tempo for the day with a high energy presentation revolving around the fact employers neglect the importance of people’s minds and offered some great tips to address this imbalance. He suggests that managing energy, not time is critical - we should look to reduce cognitive loads by placing tasks at key times. His big stat was that 72% of people think that mental health is not discussed.

 

An area that is particularly pertinent to IOR as we grow is the importance of introducing new ideas to the business. Rosie Tressler, CEO of the charity Student Minds, provided some excellent insights into what students are looking for in the workplace. Rosie talked of the need for purpose and related 5 key findings relating to student work experience that employers must work on:

1. Quality of Induction

2. Support - a Buddy System

3. Time Management Training

4. Pro-active/Re-active around Mental Health

5. Involvement in decision-making

As employers, we can learn much from these findings.

 

 

Kate Taylor from Gather & Gather spoke, appropriately, just before the lunch break about our emotional connection with food, which she suggests, the corporate world has neglected and created a disconnect. Kate came up with some great healthy recipes that we will try back at IOR.

 

So after a healthy lunch and chat, who gets the graveyard slot of 2pm?

 

Wellness 16 London Don't Stop Believing

 

This went to the delightful Kim Garner of Tempo Wellbeing. Kim is a Social Worker who discovered the power of singing as a group. As she enthusiastically relays her stories of the positive power of singing, we start to nervously realise what's coming.

10 minutes later there are 150 people belting out 'Don’t Stop Believing', including air guitars and ‘Dad dancing’. Rosie Tressier sat next to me, has the voice of an angel next to my tone-deaf sing-along but the whole thing is truly uplifting and we are ready for the afternoon session.

 

The very insightful, shamelessly book plugging, Dr Nerina Ramlakhan was up next and gave a quite brilliant and very funny review of how we can improve our quality of sleep.

Nerina said that what we were actually craving was more energy and stated her 5 non-negotiables for improved quality of sleep. So, if you're struggling on the sleep front, here's the start points:

1. Eat Breakfast within 30 minutes of rising

2. Decrease your volume of stimulants

3. Increase your level of hydration

4. Unplug. You need healthy boundaries to technology. You need quiet.

5. Go to bed early, pre 10.30pm, 3-4 nights per week

There you have it, along with avoiding 'musterbation' as Dr Nerina Ramlakhan refers to 'the desire to tell yourself that you must perform certain tasks in the morning'. She suggests going to sleep with contentment in mind rather than a challenge.

 

Ann Marie Aguilar from Arup led a section on the importance of design in relation to wellbeing. Ann Marie spread the word regarding WELL Building Certification. An excellent initiative that we have been working with Ann Marie on for one of our clients. The application of measures to a building’s performance in relation to wellbeing is something that is long overdue and is picking up significant momentum.

 

Randy Fiser, CEO at ASID, reviewed the design and fit out of his office space and talked about the quest for both LEED and WELL platinum status.

I particularly liked his piece regarding the influence of circadian lighting.

 

Lillian Antonio from Herman Miller spoke eloquently regarding the importance of corporate culture in relation to stress levels. Interestingly, she stated that people with 'best friend' relationships at work are 7 times more likely to engage with the business.

 

Jeremy Myerson and Philip Tidd talked us through some excellent research that has been recently carried out by Gensler and the newly formed insight group Worktech Academy.

 

 Dr Craig Night of Haddleton Knight gave an energy packed plea to give people a level of autonomy in the design of their working environment. Also stating that he felt that much of current design is 'laddist' - being all about pool tables, bars and slides.

 

The conference was wrapped up by the machine gun delivery of Carl Honore who ironically was talking regarding the need for a 'slow revolution'. He outlined thoughts from his award-winning  best seller 'In Praise of Slow'. The premise being that we have forgotten how to do one thing at a time.

 

"We live in a world of Speed Yoga and Drive through Funerals!"

 

Carl suggests that the key is to do things at the right tempo and that this is sometimes slow. He pushes the need for complete focus, as opposed to 'busy' being the new badge of honour. His big stat was that interruptions can reduce IQ by as much as 10 points.

 

Quoting Pasternak in 1917 ' In an epoch of speed, one must think slowly'.

 

So, a terrific and insightful conference with many perspectives and many nuggets to take away and a tune I can't get out of my head - 'Don't stop believing...’



Back to articles

TAGS Wellbeing & Wellness Workplace Trends Ways of Working Office Design Office Fit Out

Comments

Comments have been turned off!

Archive

2019 (1)

Alert: The was a critical error when processing this page, please contact an administrator.

2018 (2)

Alert: The was a critical error when processing this page, please contact an administrator.

2017 (7)

Alert: The was a critical error when processing this page, please contact an administrator.

2016 (6)

Alert: The was a critical error when processing this page, please contact an administrator.

2015 (7)

Alert: The was a critical error when processing this page, please contact an administrator.

2014 (16)

Alert: The was a critical error when processing this page, please contact an administrator.

2013 (1)

Alert: The was a critical error when processing this page, please contact an administrator.

2012 (4)

Alert: The was a critical error when processing this page, please contact an administrator.